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Bridge Inspection – Wire Ropes Saved By Robotic MFL

robotic bridge inspections

Magnetic Flux Leakage “MFL”  has been used to detect corrosion and pitting in steel structures for years. MFL (Magnetic Flux Leakage) is an electromagnetic non-destructive testing method that is proven and has been around for a long time. Infrastructure Preservation Corporation, “IPC” is a non-destructive robotic engineering company that has integrated MFL with robotics and specialized software to provide quantitative data on critical infrastructure assets worldwide.  Watch the explainer video below.

 

 

 

 

The basic principal is that a powerful rare earth magnet is used to magnetize the steel as it travels along the sheathing.  CableScan videos the exterior of the sheathing for potential issues while locating corrosive pitting and loss of metallic area in the steel inside the sheathing. A major advancement over the current visual and subjective inspection of just the exterior or the sheathing, we now have a screening tool for potential damage in the steel that holds up the bridge. 

 

ith IPCs robotic bridge inspection and wire rope inspection technology can inspect all of the cable stays and suspender cables for bridge inspections and exceeds FHWA and AASHTO requirements for current NBI inspections. 

 

Magnetic Flux leakage works by measuring the magnetic field that “leaks” from the steel. In an MFL tool, a magnetic detector is placed between the poles of the magnet to detect the leakage field. Analysts interpret the chart recording of the leakage field to identify damaged areas and hopefully to estimate the location and depth of metal loss.  

magnetic flux leakage inspection
Magnetic flux leakage

Infrastructure Preservation Corporation, IPC has utilized this 30 year old technology integrated with advanced robotics and software to develop advanced nondestructive robotic infrastructure testing to better understand our infrastructures and the inspected components current condition.

 

 

Subsequent inspections can show deterioration progression over time providing more valuable data with each inspection. By understanding the rate of deterioration over time, asset owners can better budget for maintenance and repairs.

 

cable stay bridge inspection

Videos the entire exterior and takes stills of any anomaly’s. Peers through the HDPE sheathing to locate loss of metallic area and corrosion in the steel that holds up the bridge. No lane closures or bucket trucks required. For more information contact [email protected]

 

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